An Introduction to Tantric Philosophy: The Paramārthasāra of

Author note: Translated by means of Lyne Bansat-Boudon and Kamalesha Datta Tripathi
Publish 12 months note: First released February 1st 2013
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The Paramārthasāra, or ‘Essence of final Reality’, is a piece of the Kashmirian polymath Abhinavagupta (tenth–eleventh centuries). it's a short treatise during which the writer outlines the doctrine of which he's a impressive exponent, specifically nondualistic Śaivism, which he designates in his works because the Trika, or ‘Triad’ of 3 rules: Śiva, Śakti and the embodied soul (nara).

The major curiosity of the Paramārthasāra isn't just that it serves as an advent to the tested doctrine of a practice, but additionally advances the proposal of jiv̄anmukti, ‘liberation during this life’, as its middle subject. additional, it doesn't confine itself to an exposition of the doctrine as such yet from time to time tricks at a moment experience mendacity underneath the obtrusive feel, specifically esoteric suggestions and practices which are on the middle of the philosophical discourse. Its commentator, Yogarāja (eleventh century), excels in detecting and clarifying these quite a few degrees of that means. An advent to Tantric Philosophy provides, in addition to a seriously revised Sanskrit textual content, the 1st annotated English translation of either Abhinavagupta’s Paramārthasāra and Yogarāja’s commentary.

This e-book may be of curiosity to Indologists, in addition to to experts and scholars of faith, Tantric reports and Philosophy.

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An Introduction to Tantric Philosophy: The Paramārthasāra of Abhinavagupta with the Commentary of Yogarāja (1st Edition)

Writer be aware: Translated by way of Lyne Bansat-Boudon and Kamalesha Datta Tripathi
Publish 12 months notice: First released February 1st 2013
------------------------

The Paramārthasāra, or ‘Essence of final Reality’, is a piece of the Kashmirian polymath Abhinavagupta (tenth–eleventh centuries). it's a short treatise during which the writer outlines the doctrine of which he's a impressive exponent, particularly nondualistic Śaivism, which he designates in his works because the Trika, or ‘Triad’ of 3 rules: Śiva, Śakti and the embodied soul (nara).

The major curiosity of the Paramārthasāra isn't just that it serves as an creation to the confirmed doctrine of a convention, but in addition advances the proposal of jiv̄anmukti, ‘liberation during this life’, as its center subject matter. additional, it doesn't confine itself to an exposition of the doctrine as such yet from time to time tricks at a moment feel mendacity underneath the obvious feel, specifically esoteric ideas and practices which are on the center of the philosophical discourse. Its commentator, Yogarāja (eleventh century), excels in detecting and clarifying these quite a few degrees of which means. An advent to Tantric Philosophy offers, in addition to a seriously revised Sanskrit textual content, the 1st annotated English translation of either Abhinavagupta’s Paramārthasāra and Yogarāja’s commentary.

This e-book may be of curiosity to Indologists, in addition to to experts and scholars of faith, Tantric stories and Philosophy.

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That I have thought interesting enough to collect in an ‘Anthology of spiritual experience’ (see p.  55.  1065). 101 Such is the hypothesis of Shâstri, in the preface to his edition of the Janmamaraṇavicāra — an hypothesis that might be corroborated by a few additional indices: 1) the occurrence of the image of the water-wheel (araghat ̣t ̣aghat ̣i ̄yantra), in a similar context in both YR’s commentary ad 47 and in the Janmamaraṇavicāra: 18–19; 2) Vāmadeva’s citation (pp. 20–21) of the same two verses that YR had quoted in his commentary ad 83.

96–97: ji ̄vanmukti is now philosophically established. One question remains: why are some aspirants, though genuinely desirous of liberation, not accorded their release in this life? In other words, how does one account for “gradations” or “degrees” of liberation — and sometimes even failures? The response, even though it may appear not entirely satisfactory, makes appeal to ‘divine grace’ in the form of a ‘descent of energy’ (śaktipāta): it is that ‘descent of energy’ of the Supreme Lord, unconditioned, unrestricted, 115 and yet varied, that liberates.

89–102), that death does not interrupt or modify the fact of liberation.  81–88: new portrait of the ji ̄vanmukta, again in quasi-philosophical terms (81): the commentary borrowing from the Sāṃkhyakārikā the famous image of the potter’s wheel (without however acknowledging the 2. THE PARAMĀRTHASĀRA OF ABHINAVAGUPTA 29 source [SK 67], which it cites almost verbatim), the living body of the ‘knower’ is said there, like the potter’s wheel, to “spin” for some time after the last impulsion given to it by the potter.

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